Below you’ll find a quick and easy #ArtAtHome assignment: decorate a postcard to support the arts and fill out your own Statement of Self. This art-based challenge is part of a series that celebrates past ArtPrize-winning entries. More art challenges from this series are available here.

Advocate for the Arts Postcard

Download your template
 

Complete a postcard to send to your legislators: Decorate the front that reads ADVOCATE FOR THE ARTS, and on the back write why you think that the arts are valuable to you and your community, and why art programs should receive government funding. Address and mail your post card to start the conversation with your representatives. Find out who your legislators are and their office addresses by searching here. Print off another postcard to send to a friend!

Statement of Self

Download your worksheet


What you’ll need:

  • Pen or pencil
  • Colored pencils, markers, or crayons

How to make it:

  1. Print out the template above. If you don’t have a printer at home, write down the prompts on a sheet of paper.
  2. Fill in your answers to questions about yourself and draw a self portrait in the provided box. Put it on display at home or file it away for you to find later. Send the template to a friend so they can complete it, too!

Our Inspiration for this Challenge

The Bureau of Personal Belonging by Stacey Kirby, Juried Grand Prize Winner at ArtPrize 2016

The Bureau of Personal Belonging is a series of ongoing performative interactions set within a site-specific installation of vintage offices. Works such as The Declaration Project, VALIDnation and I AM reframe bureaucratic processes through audience engagement. Kirby travels the country setting up similar installations, empowering people to perform alongside her as part of the staff.

Visitors become participants by filling out forms that Kirby creates in response to national conversations about civil rights and the validity of communities, families and individuals. The completed paperwork is mailed to elected public officials as a form of direct activism, bringing the conversation from art space to lawmakers.

By Allison Palm on