Gendercide

Manda McKay's avatar Manda McKay

Gendercide is killing based on gender. Most victims are female, and most perpetrators are the parents. Although common in Asia, this practice does occur at times in the United States, usually in the form of sex selective abortions. This is no small problem. It is thought that, in the past few decades, at least 160 million baby girls have been aborted, murdered, left to starve to death, or even thrown into the garbage while still alive. And this affects females who are not targeted. One consequence of gendercide has been the shortage of women available for men in these areas to marry, leading to the trafficking of women from outside countries to be forced into marriage. I tried to depict this heartbreaking issue in a palatable way. I left the composition of the painting simple and uncluttered to spotlight the issue. I used a pink flower to represent baby girls, while the feather represents violence against them. A feather is something we normally consider soft, but here it is a weapon. To me this is an appropriate way to depict infanticide committed by a parent who should instead be showering his or her baby with love. Although this is an unpleasant subject for a painting, I feel that people will be able to confront this topic since I've used allegorical objects rather than an actual baby. I wanted to enter this piece in ArtPrize to reach as many viewers as possible and hopefully inspire a solution. Many people are unfamiliar with the term and don't realize that gendercide exists. Even my spellcheck does not recognize the word. How can you help? One small step is to vote for politicians who fight for basic human rights. You can sign a petition or support one of the organizations devoted to ending gendercide. Also, everybody needs to speak out against this practice and condemn it. Raising awareness is important, because there is always strength in numbers.

Entry Details
  • Art form: 2-D
  • Depth: 1 inch
  • Medium: oil on canvas
  • Width: 24 inches
  • Year created: 2012
  • Height: 30 inches