ArtPrize On Screen, presented by the Michigan Film & Digital Media Office and produced by Celebration! Cinema, is back for another year with 13 new narrative, documentary and short films. Celebration! Cinema will bring screenings of new and independent cinema, each to be preceded by a Michigan-made short film curated by the UICA’s Open Projector Night Series. Open to all, programming will run from September 20–23 at the historic Ladies’ Literary Club located at 61 Sheldon Blvd SE, next door to the ArtPrize HUB/HQ.

Film Screenings

Wednesday, September 20

7:30 PM—"DINA"
Written and Produced by Dan Sickles and Antionio Santini

THE VIETNAM WAR and DINA screenings will have open captioning.

Commencing a week full of cinematic creativity is  "Dina"—winner of the Grand Jury Prize: U.S. Documentary at Sundance Film Festival. Dina, an outspoken and eccentric 49-year-old in suburban Philadelphia, invites her fiancé Scott, a Walmart door greeter, to move in with her. Having grown up neurologically diverse in a world blind to the value of their experience, the two are headover-heels for one another, but shacking up poses a new challenge. Scott freezes when it comes to physical intimacy, and Dina, a Kardashians fanatic, wants nothing more than to share with Scott all she’s learned about sensual desire from books, TV shows, and her previous marriage. Her increasingly creative forays to draw Scott close keep hitting roadblocks—exposing anxieties, insecurities, and communication snafus while they strive to reconcile their conflicting approaches to romance and intimacy.

For this screening, Celebration!Cinema continues its collaboration with DisArt, a local arts organization committed to using contemporary art to stimulate dialogues about disability and its place in culture. DisArt invites you to a community conversation about the power of media in creating our understandings of physical and mental differences before the screening at 7 PM and briefly after the film. Join DisArt’s Jill Vyn and Christopher Smit for an evening of conversation, film, and community making. 

Watch this trailer and dive into the life of "Dina." 

 

"Dina" will be preceded by Michigan-made short film, It Ain’t Over, directed by Karl Keolling—through which a retired pastor tells his story of living with ALS, and how he coped with the forecast of death quickly approaching. 

Thursday, September 21

7:30 PM—"12TH & CLAIRMOUNT"
Directed by: Brian Kaufman
Produced by: Kathy Kieliszewski and Bill McGraw

Home movie footage—donated by metro Detroiters—formed the backbone for documentary "12th and Clairmount." The film looks back at the causes and aftermath of the 1967 Detroit riots. Those five days in July were among the most pivotal — and divisive — in the city’s history, with the turmoil leaving 43 dead. While the impending 50th anniversary of the summer of ’67 was the impetus for the film, the home movie footage in “12th and Clairmount” captures a wide spectrum of Detroit life, from proud streetscapes to dance parties to neighborhood sporting events.

The documentary is produced by the Free Press in collaboration with Bridge Magazine and WXYZ-TV (Channel 7) and a group of metro Detroit cultural institutions, led by the Detroit Institute of Arts.

Take a trip back to the 1960's and watch the trailer for "12th and Clairmount." 

 

Paired with “12th & Clairmount” will be the Michigan-made short film, “The Festival”, directed by Taylor Stanton—a look into one of Michigan’s most unexpected and unique regional events, The Bay-Rama Fly Fish Festival.

Friday, September 22

11 AM—"MORE ART UPSTAIRS" (GRPS Student Screening)
Written and Produced by Jody Jassett Sanchez

A revolution is taking place in the art world and it isn’t happening in Paris, Berlin or Hong Kong—but in Grand Rapids, Michigan. ArtPrize is the most highly attended art show in the world, and it awards cash prizes larger than all other competitions combined. International critics and general crowds pack bars, galleries and abandoned buildings all over town, taking in over 1,500 works from cerebral conceptualists and weekend hobbyists. Nimble cameras follow four artists, each vying not only for critical recognition but for every public vote they can drum up. Part classy game show, part engaging art exploration, "More Art Upstairs" captures the debates ArtPrize has intentionally (or inadvertently?) triggered: Can culture be democratized? Do artists need or want to connect with audiences? And is the canonical art establishment on its way out?

Check out this sneak peek of one of the featured artists in the trailer for "More Art Upstairs." 

 

This feature film will be preceded by Michigan-made short, “How Do We Sing?”, directed by Jarod Facknitz—during which the protagonists hear a voice in the sky, though it may not be what they think.

6 PM—"THE VIETNAM WAR"
Written and Produced by Ken Burns

THE VIETNAM WAR and DINA screenings will have open captioning.

In an immersive 360-degree narrative, Burns and Novick tell the epic story of the Vietnam War as it has never before been told on film. "The Vietnam War" features testimony from nearly 100 witnesses, including many Americans who fought in the war and others who opposed it, as well as Vietnamese combatants and civilians from both the winning and losing sides. Six years in the making, the series brings the war and the chaotic epoch it encompassed viscerally to life. Written by Geoffrey C. Ward, produced by Sarah Botstein, Novick and Burns, it includes rarely seen, digitally re-mastered archival footage from sources around the globe, photographs taken by some of the most celebrated photojournalists of the 20th Century, historic television broadcasts, evocative home movies, revelatory audio recordings from inside the Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon administrations and more than 100 iconic musical recordings by many of the greatest artists of the era.

Get an inside look of what's to come for "The Vietnam War." 

 

This screening will be preceded by the short film, “Official Shorts”, directed by John Morris Paul—through which Short’s Brewing Company shares their journey from infancy to a successful business. 

9 PM—"MORE ART UPSTAIRS" (Public Screening)

“More Art Upstairs” returns at for a public screening, preceded by the short film, “Red Skies”, directed by Brett Miller—during which a red sky foretells the coming of creatures that cause havoc. When the sky illuminates red; creatures cause havoc.

Saturday, September 23

6 PM—"HUMAN FLOW"
Directed by Ai Weiwei
Written by Boris Cheshirkov, Tim Finsh and Chinchin Yap

Filmed in 23 countries over the course of more than a year, "Human Flow" chronicles the staggering breadth of the global refugee crisis. Weiwei captures the condition of today’s more than 65 million displaced individuals who fled their homes in search of new lives.

Get a sneak peek at "Human Flow" below.


 

 

“Human Flow” will be preceded by Michigan-made short film, “Manifesto”, directed by Don Deleon—the story of a young man blinded by love who carries out a dangerous task at the Los Angeles Staples arena.

 

10 PM—"THE NEW RADICAL"
Written & Directed by Adam Bhala Lough
Produced by Lucy Sumner, Alex Needles, Brent Stiefel and Greg Stewart

In this observational diptych, "The New Radical" glimpses a rarified world, filled with embittered young people born into a dreamless, corporatized, and deeply politicized generation, where the only real resistance is at their fingertips—the internet. Making a printable gun landed Cody Wilson on the government’s watchlist. Together with British programmer Amir Taaki, they founded Dark Wallet, a Bitcoin app that allows its users to “go dark.” But Dark Wallet was more than an app, it was a way of expressing their ideals valuing human freedoms over controlling governments. For cryptoanarchists, ensuring freedom of information and challenging economic structures are the best way to hold truth to power. But taking on the government means you don’t always get to go home. In this observational diptych, Adam Lough glimpses a rarified world, filled with embittered young people born into a dreamless, corporatized, and deeply politicized generation, where the only real resistance is at their fingertips—the internet.

Check out the trailer below. 

 

The 10 p.m. screening will be preceded by Michigan-made short film, “The Party Foul”, directed by Stephen Pell—following a registered sex offender whose first task after being released from jail is stopping by a party.

Want to Volunteer?

If you'd like to volunteer to usher at ArtPrize On Screen, visit here or contact the volunteer team directly at volunteer@artprize.org. 

Ticket Information

Film screening tickets are free, but reservations must be arranged for seats in the theater. Tickets can be reserved on Celebration! Cinema's website.  Rush Lines will form outside the venue 45 minutes before showtime. Fifteen minutes prior to showtime, any unfilled seats will be released to the Rush Line.

By Alee'a Ulsh-Cherry on