Our Walking Paths this year have evolved into being less strenuous as well as a way to learn about Grand Rapids one neighborhood at a time. Each walking path, between one and 2.2 miles, begins at Rosa Parks Circle and reaches out into each of the 5 neighborhoods in the ArtPrize district. We can now reach out to more venues and cover more ground. With each path starting and ending at Rosa Park Circle, it is easy to locate your next path and follow into a different part of the city. All neighborhoods are unique in their own way and we’re thrilled that this year’s walking paths will help you explore all the awesomeness of every nook and cranny of Grand Rapids. To help you choose which path is the best one for YOU to start with, this week’s blog posts will overview what you’ll see, smell, hear and feel in each neighborhood. Let’s look at Monroe North...

-What a splendid walk this is. When making your way out of Center City, this walking path will lead you to the inspiration behind ArtPrize’s logo, La Grande Vitesse by Alexander Calder.

-Continuing on you’ll find Monroe North to be a hidden gem of Grand Rapids. Just under the freeway and down the street are a collection of restaurants, bars, small businesses and lovely parks.

-This 2.1 mile path will guide you along the riverside. You’ll be able to view the Fish Ladder, one of the cities structural parks built for the river.

-DASH North & South runs directly through the middle of this path and can drop you back off into the city.

-I find that this path is a breathe of fresh air and feels like you're stepping out of the city. This quaint side of town has two great parks, Sixth St. Bridge Park and Canal St. Park, which are great for picnics and viewing ArtPrize artwork.

The National Endowment for the Arts awarded ArtPrize an Our Town grant to help us keep ArtPrize active. Want to track your steps for ArtPrize? Download the MapMyWalk mobile app and search for ArtPrize as a friend. There you will find all of the walking paths right on your phone. So, enjoy being healthy and happy while learning about art.

By Annie DeYoung on